Tokyo Otaku Mode Launches “MiraiMode.com” A Kickstarter Clone

MiraiMode

The team over at Tokyo Otaku Mode Inc. have been quiet for sometime. The company originally began as a Facebook page dedicated to Japanese pop culture and news later opened a global ecommerce shop selling everything an over-seas otaku might desire. Just a few months ago they bought the company SkoshBox Inc. and re-branded the Japanese-snack subscription service for their own.

Now the company is launching what looks like a Kickstarter clone with the focus on interesting Japanese products.

The company has appropriately named their Kickstarter clone “MiraiMode”. Mirai in Japanese translates to future in English, and the name certainly showcases the cool Japanese products that people anywhere in the world can support. Just checkout one of the first product listed on the website:

Key-Quest | 6-In-1 Multi-Tool
Key-Quest Multi-Tool

At the time of writing this article the company has a goal of raising $5,000 USD for this multi-functional key with $325 already raised by supporters. That isn’t too bad for a key that can be used to open boxes, cut a fishing line, open a bottle of your favorite Sake or Japanese beer and act as a small wrench. The tool is made in Japan so you know the quality will be lasting and the price isn’t too bad when you consider the amount of money you would spend individual tools that¬†perform the same function.

The other two products aren’t as interesting in my opinion. You have a bluetooth speaker that levitates above a plate while glowing with color that matches the tempo of the music and IoT drag-n-drop software allowing anyone to make IoT applications with no coding experience.

All in all the first three products are pretty cool but have very little relation with what Tokyo Otaku Mode is known for, Japanese pop culture merchandise. It’ll be cool to see what future¬†Japanese products come in the future and what consumers decide to support or neglect.

JD

JD is the founder of the Otaku Network and Otaku Insider. His love for Japanese pop culture began early in life evolving into what some may consider an "unhealthy" obsession for all things Japan. He just calls it passion.

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